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Paradox: The Body in the Age of AI
Oct 5, 2018–Feb 3, 2019
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  • Selected Art
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Artists: Zach Blas, Brian Bress, Nick Cave, Kate Cooper, Stephanie Dinkins, Jes Fan, Claudia Hart, Eunsu Kang, Jillian Mayer, Sarah Oppenheimer, Siebren Versteeg

Curated by Elizabeth Chodos 

This exhibition explores the primacy of the human body as it’s poised on the precipice of a potential fusion with artificial intelligence. Inspired by the Moravec Paradox, the show looks deeper into the unconscious role the body’s sensorimotor habitat has in shaping our awareness, imagination, and socio-political structures. Society tends to privilege reason and logic because it is conscious and quantifiable. But beneath this thin “veneer …

Artists: Zach Blas, Brian Bress, Nick Cave, Kate Cooper, Stephanie Dinkins, Jes Fan, Claudia Hart, Eunsu Kang, Jillian Mayer, Sarah Oppenheimer, Siebren Versteeg

Curated by Elizabeth Chodos 

This exhibition explores the primacy of the human body as it’s poised on the precipice of a potential fusion with artificial intelligence. Inspired by the Moravec Paradox, the show looks deeper into the unconscious role the body’s sensorimotor habitat has in shaping our awareness, imagination, and socio-political structures. Society tends to privilege reason and logic because it is conscious and quantifiable. But beneath this thin “veneer of human thought” is a deeper, more complex knowledge system within the body. As technologists imagine the potentials of merging humans with AI, these artists consider the body’s elusive and underestimated power. Their various investigations across multiple media offer room to speculate about the exchange between the unconscious and conscious, and ask questions about what the body knows. Before we enter a generation where cyborgs are as ubiquitous as the internet, in a time when we still inhabit human bodies, the urgent questions to ask are what lessons can our mortal vessels teach us and what unknown paradox might we contain?

Exhibition on all three floors.
 

Exhibition Statement

Disembodied environments for interaction have proliferated with the emergence of social media, which have provided endless opportunities for social life to play out in virtual space, with no physical contact. This new setting has powerfully connected millions of people, but the disembodied nature of these interactions also facilitates dehumanization. The increased access to strangers across the globe fans the flames of xenophobic ideologies, nationalism, and us vs. them mentalities. The fact that technology’s abilities to connect and to divide are equally powerful is a paradoxical outcome of these advances that previous generations could not have foreseen. 

In the late 80’s, artificial intelligence and robotics scientists had promised huge developments that they then struggled to deliver. The Moravec Paradox was one the many challenges delaying progress. It showed that high-level reasoning and logic problems required only little computation, whereas basic sensorimotor skills like walking, or seeing, required enormous amounts of computational resources. CMU faculty, Hans Moravec, theorized that this paradox could be explained by the process of human evolution. He writes, “Encoded in the large, highly evolved sensory and motor portions of the human brain is a billion years of experience about the nature of the world and how to survive in it. The deliberate process we call reasoning is, I believe, the thinnest veneer of human thought, effective only because it is supported by this much older and much more powerful, though usually unconscious, sensorimotor knowledge.” This paradox reveals that there is fundamental information stored in the dialogical relationship of the mind and body; its unconscious nature belies its critical role and its levels of complexity.

At about the same time as the discovery of the Moravec Paradox, Donna Haraway was imagining the cultural implications of new technologies, and published her influential essay, The Cyborg Manifesto, in 1984. In her feminist text, the human/machine amalgam presents a theoretical framework where the category-blurring cyborg breaks down traditional social and political boundaries. Her essay offers a utopic premise that the cyborg might provide the conditions to imagine structures outside of the sexist, classist, and racists systems of patriarchy, capitalism, and colonialism. In it she writes, “Liberation rests on the construction of consciousness, the imaginative apprehension, of oppression, and so of possibility.” Since this essay was published, some of the dystopian influences of AI have been brought to bear through data surveillance, privacy breaches, and election meddling. Could the paradox in the age of the cyborg be technology’s equal role in liberation and oppression? 

Today, access to much faster computers, big data, and more sophisticated machine learning has allowed the AI field to overcome many of the challenges Moravec and his colleagues faced in the 80s. Unprecedented advances and applications of AI are causing a techno-social paradigm shift to rapidly take hold. Entrepreneurs like Elon Musk actively develop technological enhancements, through products like Neuralink, to embed software into the body that can merge humans with AI. Before the turn of the next century the cyborg may be the new status quo.

This exhibition explores the primacy of the human body as it’s poised on the precipice of a potential fusion with artificial intelligence. Inspired by the Moravec Paradox, the show looks deeper into the unconscious role the body’s sensorimotor habitat has in shaping our awareness, imagination, and socio-political structures. Society tends to privilege reason and logic because it is conscious and quantifiable. But beneath this thin “veneer of human thought” is a deeper, more complex knowledge system within the body. As technologists imagine the potentials of merging humans with AI, these artists consider the body’s elusive and underestimated power. Their various investigations across multiple media offer room to speculate about the exchange between the unconscious and conscious, and ask questions about what the body knows. Before we enter a generation where cyborgs are as ubiquitous as the internet, in a time when we still inhabit human bodies, the urgent questions to ask are what lessons can our mortal vessels teach us and what unknown paradox might we contain?

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Title 1, 2017, steel, concrete, tablet, custom software
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Salon Discussion lead by Dana Bishop-Root

Nov 8, 2018, 6–8pm

FEATURING
Dana Bishop-Root


 

The 2018/2019 Miller ICA Salons are a four-part discussion series co-organized by the Miller ICA and facilitator, Dana Bishop-Root, who is an artist living and working in Braddock, PA.

​The Miller ICA Salons are facilitated topical conversations that include the general public and expert guest respondents who have been invited to do or share existing research on each conversation topic. The research compiled by each respondent will be made available to the public through the Miller ICA website prior to the Salon, and the public will have access to …

The 2018/2019 Miller ICA Salons are a four-part discussion series co-organized by the Miller ICA and facilitator, Dana Bishop-Root, who is an artist living and working in Braddock, PA.

​The Miller ICA Salons are facilitated topical conversations that include the general public and expert guest respondents who have been invited to do or share existing research on each conversation topic. The research compiled by each respondent will be made available to the public through the Miller ICA website prior to the Salon, and the public will have access to it before joining the discussion as supplemental information. Research that is shared can range from reading lists to lists of people to follow, to podcasts. Three moderators of diverse backgrounds will be chosen for each discussion to bring a wealth of cross disciplinary ideas, perspectives and modalities to the conversation, creating a space where the public can access free college-level, seminar-style discussions on pressing issues. The goal of these Salons is to animate engaged  citizenship through conversation and exchange in free public space.

The first salon will be on Nov 8th, 2018 and will explore ideas around the body in the age of artificial intelligence. More details, including names of guest respondents, are coming soon!

The Miller ICA Salons are facilitated topical conversations that include the general public and expert guest respondents who have been invited to do or share existing research on each conversation topic. The research compiled by each respondent will be made available to the public through the Miller ICA website prior to the Salon, and the public will have access to it before joining the discussion as supplemental information. Research that is shared can range from reading lists to lists of people to follow, to podcasts. Three moderators of diverse backgrounds will be chosen for each discussion to bring a wealth of cross disciplinary ideas, perspectives and modalities to the conversation, creating a space where the public can access free college-level, seminar-style discussions on pressing issues. The goal of these Salons is to animate engaged  citizenship through conversation and exchange in free public space.

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Reception Paradox: The Body in the Age of AI

Oct 4, 2018, 6–8pm

PARADOX: THE BODY IN THE AGE OF AI

Curated by Elizabeth Chodos 
Oct. 5, 2018 - Feb. 3, 2019

RSVP on Facebook

event on all three floors

Past
Carrie Schneider: Reading Women
Aug 18–Sep 9, 2018
  • About
  • Selected Art
  • Artists
  • Events

Work by CMU alumna Carrie Schneider ushers in the 2018/19 academic year. The exhibition, Reading Women, explores the power of reading, studying, and being absorbed by knowledge. In the artist’s words, the work “reveals a constellation of influences among my creative peers.” This series is a rhizomatic view of thinkers who contribute to the intellectual capital of the artist’s community. “It’s a man’s world,” as the saying goes, but this exhibition offers a countervailing proposition. The ideas in these books shape thought, and by shaping thought, form a world made …

Work by CMU alumna Carrie Schneider ushers in the 2018/19 academic year. The exhibition, Reading Women, explores the power of reading, studying, and being absorbed by knowledge. In the artist’s words, the work “reveals a constellation of influences among my creative peers.” This series is a rhizomatic view of thinkers who contribute to the intellectual capital of the artist’s community. “It’s a man’s world,” as the saying goes, but this exhibition offers a countervailing proposition. The ideas in these books shape thought, and by shaping thought, form a world made entirely by women. In repeating the same elegant and matter-of-fact gesture he exhibition forces us to consider what a world would look like if we were all reading women.

Exhibition on first floor.

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Carrie Schneider, this is the title, 2012–2014, 30x36 inches, Chromogenic print
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Carrie Schneider, 2012–2014, 30x36 inches, Chromogenic print
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Carrie Schneider, 2012–2014, 30x36 inches, Chromogenic print
Carrie Schneider
About the Artists
Carrie Schneider

Carrie Schneider received her BHA from Carnegie Mellon University, and her MFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She attended the Whitney Independent Study Program, the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, and the Finnish Academy of Fine Arts in Helsinki, as a Fulbright Fellow. She has received a Joan Mitchell Foundation Residency Fellowship, a Jerome Foundation NYC Film/Video Grant, and a Creative Capital Award. Exhibitions include the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Finnish Museum of Photography, Helsinki; the California Museum of Photography, Riverside; Galería Alberto Sendros, Buenos Aires; santralistanbul, Istanbul; Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen; The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; and the Changjiang Museum of Contemporary Art, China, among others.

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Reading Women
Autumn House Press Reading + Reception

Sep 7, 2018, 6–8pm

6–7pm: Autumn House Press Reading featuring Adriana Ramirez, Sherrie Flick, Judith Vollmer, and Toi Derricotte
7–8pm: Reception

 

RSVP on Facebook

event on first floor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dot Gov
May 5–19, 2018
  • About

CMU 2018 Senior Art Exhibition

Co-organized by the School of Art

Works by: Olanrewaju Adetola, Melanie Anderson, Joshua Archer, Sydney Ayers, Anna Baldi, Katherine Cao, Adrienne Cassel, Hizal Celik, Kelli Clark, Matthew Constant, Christopher Copeland, Lucy Denegre, Andrew Edwards, Emily Giedzinski, Ella Hepner, Jenna Houston, Zaria Howard, Cindy Hsu, Youhyun Jang, Vanessa (Yookyung) Kim, Kasem Kydd, Summer Leavitt, Samantha Mack, Rebecca Marcus, Lisa Park, Faye-Belle Quinn, Sarah Stinson Hurwitz, Chantal Striepe, Gowri Sunder, Jack Taylor, William Taylor, Jessica Tsai, Charlotte-Alyss Weissglass, Kate Werth, Grace Wong, Morgan Rolland

"The threshold to the future has …

CMU 2018 Senior Art Exhibition

Co-organized by the School of Art

Works by: Olanrewaju Adetola, Melanie Anderson, Joshua Archer, Sydney Ayers, Anna Baldi, Katherine Cao, Adrienne Cassel, Hizal Celik, Kelli Clark, Matthew Constant, Christopher Copeland, Lucy Denegre, Andrew Edwards, Emily Giedzinski, Ella Hepner, Jenna Houston, Zaria Howard, Cindy Hsu, Youhyun Jang, Vanessa (Yookyung) Kim, Kasem Kydd, Summer Leavitt, Samantha Mack, Rebecca Marcus, Lisa Park, Faye-Belle Quinn, Sarah Stinson Hurwitz, Chantal Striepe, Gowri Sunder, Jack Taylor, William Taylor, Jessica Tsai, Charlotte-Alyss Weissglass, Kate Werth, Grace Wong, Morgan Rolland

"The threshold to the future has been hijacked. Bullies, bad language, and bellicose antics have set it on fire and outfitted it with a small film crew to capture everyone who dares to run through it. The noble feats of the willing are then broadcast live, in a non-narrative reality show for all to watch.

Try to recall that once-glittery future, when a networked commons democratized access and made way for many silenced voices. That promise, too, was hijacked, or perhaps handed over—and then weaponized—to weaken democracy itself. Now get offline: there are books to read.

As you consider the efforts within this modest catalog, know that this threshold is real, and that the present is tense for those who aspire to transform it. But also leave space for levity, empathy, and the abstract. Yes, the promise of the butterfly is dead, and in its place a whipworm persists, infects, and multiplies. The body politic is a host to horrors. Some say the cycle will last only four years, others say eight; a handful insist it will be longer. Either way, we clearly have work to do to survive it.

In this moment, is it fair to look into the void? Can we shop, browse, like, or swipe left any longer? Should we break plates or throw rocks? Did we usher in this darkness, or have these worms been spreading through us all along? Never mind. Quick—focus—your debt is accruing! There are jobs to gain, memes to post, relationships to record. Hey, did anyone read about the very good pope and the virtuous Federal Bureau of Investigation?

Stop scrolling, and look up.

Tomorrow is imminent, and in this simple truth there is a light. The end of complacency marks the starting line for action, for belief in oneself and others, for the potential of transformation. So we begin here, branded in fire, a generation engaging the future with eyes wider and minds wiser than decades have seen. Things fall apart, and from these pieces we rebuild. This is a cycle; the end of one era and the start of another. To those in these rooms, on these walls and screens, and in these spaces: you shoulder the burden and reap the benefit from this rebuilding. You are a turning point, and everyone is watching. "

- Charlie White, Regina and Marlin Miller Professor, Head of the School of Art 

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Clearance
Apr 19–25, 2018
  • About

Carnegie Mellon 2018 School of Architecture thesis exhibition 

Organized by the School of Architecture

Join the CMU Architecture Seniors to see the work of Thesis, the final year studio where architectural ideas are developed to operate critically within the discipline. The project installations illustrate challenging proposals that explore contemporary questions. During the exhibition, students will present their work for discussion and critique.     

"In this exhibition, the thesis students from the School of Architecture's Bachelor's of Architecture and Master's of Urban Design interrogate value - social, cultural, economic, ecologic - as it pertains to …

Carnegie Mellon 2018 School of Architecture thesis exhibition 

Organized by the School of Architecture

Join the CMU Architecture Seniors to see the work of Thesis, the final year studio where architectural ideas are developed to operate critically within the discipline. The project installations illustrate challenging proposals that explore contemporary questions. During the exhibition, students will present their work for discussion and critique.     

"In this exhibition, the thesis students from the School of Architecture's Bachelor's of Architecture and Master's of Urban Design interrogate value - social, cultural, economic, ecologic - as it pertains to contemporary spatial practice. Capitalist value influences not only the profession’s ongoing fascination with sanitized understandings of building in the sociospatial landscape, but also its (in)ability to consider mediums that offer alternative readings on the cataclysmic trajectory of the path that it carves.

Clearance provides a space for this necessary discussion, emphasizing the importance of a transhistorical conception of space as both the producer and the product of culture. It seizes the latencies such a view offers in shaping a situated understanding of the contemporary built environment. Further, the exhibition offers a clearance of processes, ideas, and practices drawn from this education. It gives a public face to the candid adaptation of architectural skills as a form of critical practice, cultivating a space for their expanded use in the new present."

-School of Architecture class 2018

B Arch: 
Nickie Cheung - Contesting Vacancy: Exploring the Multiplicity of Space in Wilkinsburg, PA 
Sinan Goral - Mycelium as a Remediator of the Anthropocentric Condition: Rethinking the Brute Force Implications of Progressive-Assembly with Organic Self-Assembly 
Nadia Islam - Transcending Bounds: Addressing issues of marginalization within and of the Muslim community through mosque design 
KelliLaurel Mijares - Subverting Borders: Examining Barriers in Urban Space 
Ivy Faye Monroe - Art Capital: Mapping Postwar New York City Art Culture 
Cesar Neri - Mexico 44: Speculative Futures of the Chiapas Highlands 
Trent Wimbiscus - Life at the Crossroads: Emergent Landscapes and the Cultural Politics of Automobility 
Kyle Wing - Oikonomikos / Polis: The new politics of living 
Francis Yang - Existential Schema: Exploring the qualitative design method

MUD: 
Ernest Bellamy - patch-works
Tamara Cartwright - Hotel to Home: Commoning the Princess Hotel
Yidan Gong - Commoning Gejiaying Village Amidst Metropolitan Wuhan
Paul Moscoso Riofrio - Public accessibility in contested spaces: Imaging a spatially and programmatically diverse approach to the waterfront in the Suburbio of Guayaquil, Ecuador
Chun(Pure) Zheng - Mobile Street Encroachment: Shared Living Space in Lilong, Shanghai
Lu Zhu - Incremental Community

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Immutable Stage
Mar 17–Apr 8, 2018
  • About
  • Artists

CMU 2018 MFA Thesis Exhibition

Works by: Shobun Baile, Alex Lukas, KR Pipkin, Gray Swartzel, Lee Webster

Co-organized by CMU School of Art

Created within the current political tumult, new works by the 2018 CMU School of Art MFA candidates examine pop culture fantasies of entertainment, capital, and collapse. Interrogating the documentarian impulse, Immutable Stage flattens a historical cycle of wealth and decay into the now, arguing that artifice is a tool with which to construct real narratives.

Shobun Baile, Alex Lukas, Everest Pipkin, Gray Swartzel, Lee Webster
About the Artists
Shobun Baile

Shobun Baile is an artist working in video, sound, writing, and sculpture. He works individually and collaborates with an evolving group of artists and writers. He received a BS from the University of Michigan, and was formerly a scientist working in virology research at Columbia University.  His work deals with the technologies and politics that exist at the intersection of architecture, space, and sound. He also makes music.

www.shobunbaile.com

Shobun Baile is an artist working in video, sound, writing, and sculpture. He works individually and collaborates with an evolving group of artists and writers. He received a BS from the University of Michigan, and was formerly a scientist working in virology research at Columbia University.  His work deals with the technologies and politics that exist at the intersection of architecture, space, and sound. He also makes music.

www.shobunbaile.com

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Alex Lukas

Alex Lukas was born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1981 and raised in nearby Cambridge. He has been exhibited internationally at commercial galleries, non-profit institutions and artist run spaces. His work is included in the collections of the New York Public Library, the Museum of Modern Art Library (New York), the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Spencer Museum of Art, the MIT List Visual Arts Center Student Loan Art Collection and the Flaxman Library at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He has lectured at The Rhode Island School of Design, The Maryland Institute College of Art, University of the Arts in Philadelphia, Alfred University and The University of Kansas. Lukas has been awarded residencies at The Bemis Center for the Arts, the Ucross Foundation, AS220 and The Jentel Foundation. He received a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design and, after stints in Chicago and Philadelphia, moved to Pittsburgh in 2015 to pursue a Masters of Fine Art degree at Carnegie Mellon University.

alexlukas.com

Alex Lukas was born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1981 and raised in nearby Cambridge. He has been exhibited internationally at commercial galleries, non-profit institutions and artist run spaces. His work is included in the collections of the New York Public Library, the Museum of Modern Art Library (New York), the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Spencer Museum of Art, the MIT List Visual Arts Center Student Loan Art Collection and the Flaxman Library at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He has lectured at The Rhode Island School of Design, The Maryland Institute College of Art, University of the Arts in Philadelphia, Alfred University and The University of Kansas. Lukas has been awarded residencies at The Bemis Center for the Arts, the Ucross Foundation, AS220 and The Jentel Foundation. He received a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design and, after stints in Chicago and Philadelphia, moved to Pittsburgh in 2015 to pursue a Masters of Fine Art degree at Carnegie Mellon University.

alexlukas.com

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Everest Pipkin

Everest Pipkin is a drawing and language artist from Bee Cave, Texas, whose work follows landscape as complicated by the advent of digital space.

Through examination of social spaces online, the physical infrastructure that supports digital technology, and the overlap of public and corporatized space, Pipkin questions the ease at which the commons- physical, social, and digital- are commodified. They produce printed material as books, chapbooks, and zines, as well as digital work in software, bots, and games. They also make drawings by hand, on paper.

Pipkin holds a BFA from University of Texas at Austin, are a MFA candidate at Carnegie Mellon University, and have shown nationally and internationally at The Design Museum of London, The Texas Biennial, XXI Triennale of Milan, The Victoria & Albert Museum, and others.

everest-pipkin.com/

Gray Swartzel

Gray Swartzel, born in Raleigh, works to navigate lived performativity and intersectional
identities as he interrogates the queer body in relation to the social construction of
motherhood. Using still and moving images, as well as installation, he reconstitutes the often-
untold episodes of his family’s matrilineage to make physical the conceptions of connectedness
and isolation. He holds a BFA from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is currently
an MFA candidate at Carnegie Mellon University, and has shown nationally and internationally
at The CICA Museum in South Korea, The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, The Museum
of Human Achievement in Austin, and others.

grayswartzel.com

Lee Webster

Lee Webster makes work about American mourning and the perpetual pop culture nostalgia machine. Working with and against documentary and narrative filmmaking, Webster resituates filmic structures as installation, looped video, and live performance to ask the viewer to look between frames to examine the complex yet mutable stuff with which we weave the stories that become our personal and social mythologies.

Webster earned her BA at Sarah Lawrence College and is a Master of Fine Arts Candidate at Carnegie Mellon University. She is the recipient of an Art Matters Foundation grant and a fellowship at the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center. Her work has been exhibited and screened at The Contemporary in Austin, TX, Microscope Gallery in Brooklyn, New York, the Portland Oregon Women’s Film Festival, as well as other venues.

leewebster.com

Faith Wilding: Fearful Symmetries
Jan 20–Feb 25, 2018
  • About
  • Artists

Faith Wilding: Fearful Symmetries the first retrospective exhibition of the influential feminist artist who played a key role in the formation of the Feminist Art Program at California State University in Fresno in 1970 and at California Institute of the Arts in Valencia in 1971.

Wilding was a major contributor to the historically significant month-long collaborative installation Womanhouse, sited in an abandoned mansion in Los Angeles in 1972, where she performed her highly celebrated work Waiting.

Faith Wilding: Fearful Symmetries includes a selection of works from Wilding’s studio practice spanning the past forty years, highlighting a …

Faith Wilding: Fearful Symmetries the first retrospective exhibition of the influential feminist artist who played a key role in the formation of the Feminist Art Program at California State University in Fresno in 1970 and at California Institute of the Arts in Valencia in 1971.

Wilding was a major contributor to the historically significant month-long collaborative installation Womanhouse, sited in an abandoned mansion in Los Angeles in 1972, where she performed her highly celebrated work Waiting.

Faith Wilding: Fearful Symmetries includes a selection of works from Wilding’s studio practice spanning the past forty years, highlighting a range of works on paper – drawings, watercolors, collage and paintings – exhibited together here for the first time. Taking up key, allegorical imagery in Wilding’s work, the exhibition focuses on themes of “becoming,” both the transformative event itself, and the threshold to transfiguration. This state of in-between-ness is articulated through imagery of leaves, the chrysalis, hybrid beings, and liminal circumstances themselves, such as “waiting,” the subject of Wilding’s two prominent performances Waiting and Wait-With.

Wilding’s work manages to be both delicate and harsh in its exploration of the pivotal moment between private revelation and public manifestation. Viewed together in this exhibition, her work makes a powerful impression about psychological and physical transition and transformation. In the depiction of the chrysalis and the embryo, for example, gestation is suggested, while in imagery of tears, wounds, and “recombinant” bodies, emergence and materialization are pronounced. The sum of these parts provides a unique account of how themes of emergence were central to Wilding’s articulation of feminism, and her own reflections on a childhood growing up in an intentional Christian commune. 

The exhibition will be accompanied by a publication featuring original writings by Irina Aristarkhova, Mario Ontiveros, and Faith Wilding.

Faith Wilding: Fearful Symmetries is a traveling exhibition curated by Shannon R. Stratton in collaboration with Faith Wilding. The exhibition originated at Threewalls in Chicago, Illinois in January 2014 with an archive, reading room and screenings curated by Abigail Satinsky. It has since been exhibited at: Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee (September 5 - October 4, 2014); Pasadena Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena, California (September 26, 2015-January 3, 2016) and University of Houston-Clear Lake Art Gallery, Houston, Texas (September 2 - December 8, 2016).

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Faith Wilding
About the Artists
Faith Wilding

Faith Wilding is Professor Emerita of performance art at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, a graduate faculty member at Vermont College of Fine Arts, and a visiting scholar at the Pembroke Center, Brown University. Born in Paraguay, Wilding received her BA from the University of Iowa and her MFA from the California Institute of the Arts. Wilding was a co-initiator of the Feminist Art Programs in Fresno and at CalArts, and she contributed Crocheted Environment and her Waiting performance piece to the historic Womanhouse exhibition. Her artwork have been featured in major feminist exhibitions including WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution; Sexual Politics; Division of Labor: Women’s Work in Contemporary Art; and re.act Feminism. Her writing has been featured in such books as The Power of Feminist Art, By Our Own Hands, The Feminism and Visual Culture Reader, MEANING, and many more. 

Wilding has exhibited nationally and internationally, including at the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid; Centre for Contemporary Art in Glasgow; MoMA PS1 and the Bronx Museum of Art in New York; Museum of Contemporary Art and Hammer Museum in Los Angeles; University of California Riverside Museum of Art; the Singapore Art Museum; and many others. Wilding co-founded and collaborates with subRosa, a cyberfeminist cell of cultural producers using bioart and tactical performance in the public sphere to explore and critique the intersections of information and biotechnologies in women’s bodies, lives, and work, and she is the co-editor of Domain Errors! Cyberfeminist Practices! She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, Creative Capital grant, and artist grants from National Endowment for the Arts.

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Assemblage
Dec 2–10, 2017
  • About

CMU School of Design Senior Thesis Exhibition

Works by: Adella Guo, Albert Yang, Alex Palatucci, Angee Attar, Anqi Wan, Benal Johnson, Bettina Chou, Carolyn Zhou, Chris Perry, Christie Chong, Deborah Lee, Deniz Sokullu, Emily Mongilio, Faith Kaufman, Gillan Johnson, Hae Wan Park, Hee Jung Koh, Jake Scherlis, Jasper Tom, Jeong Min Seo, Jesse Klein, Jessica Headrick, Ji Tae Kim, Julia Ainbinder, Kate Martin, Kevin Gao, Lily Fulop, Lily Kim, Lois Kim, Lucy Yifan Yu, Maggie Banks, Max Plummer, Maximilien Stein, Meredith Newman, Natalie Harmon, Natapitt (Popo) Sethpornpong, Nina Flores, Noah Johnson, …

CMU School of Design Senior Thesis Exhibition

Works by: Adella Guo, Albert Yang, Alex Palatucci, Angee Attar, Anqi Wan, Benal Johnson, Bettina Chou, Carolyn Zhou, Chris Perry, Christie Chong, Deborah Lee, Deniz Sokullu, Emily Mongilio, Faith Kaufman, Gillan Johnson, Hae Wan Park, Hee Jung Koh, Jake Scherlis, Jasper Tom, Jeong Min Seo, Jesse Klein, Jessica Headrick, Ji Tae Kim, Julia Ainbinder, Kate Martin, Kevin Gao, Lily Fulop, Lily Kim, Lois Kim, Lucy Yifan Yu, Maggie Banks, Max Plummer, Maximilien Stein, Meredith Newman, Natalie Harmon, Natapitt (Popo) Sethpornpong, Nina Flores, Noah Johnson, Raphael Weikart, Rufeng (Steven) Ji, Sara Remi Fields, Selena Norman, Sharon Yu, Tiffany Jiang, Tina Park, Treat Swarstad, Ty Van de Zande, Youjin (Juliana) Nam

Co-presented by CMU School of Design

The Senior Class of the 2018 welcomes you to Assemblage, a collection of work produced by the first class to complete the new Bachelor of Design program. Projects will be featured from all three design concentrations: Products, Communications and Environments. 

Throughout the new curriculum, we are often encouraged to think about the long-term effects of our decisions and how those decisions affect the larger environment around us. At the beginning of our process we ask questions that lead to more questions, talk to people who matter, and reflect on lessons learned from the past. We do all of this while considering aesthetics and form to go beyond the components of a traditional design education. 

This approach often leads us to help others speak in order to build empathy around the user’s experiences. To convey our intentions, we craft outputs, whether a carefully communicated message or thoughtfully crafted artifact, that respond to our research and reflection. However, as creatives, we often look to express and strengthen our own voice in our personal work. So, as design professionals, when do we speak and when do we listen?

In the show, visitors will experience a wide variety of works from deeply personal narratives, to community building projects, and even future oriented artifacts. In each piece, the designer’s presence is balanced with the message of the project, whether prompted in studio or self defined. Join us as we share how the Class of 2018 has developed their individual voices and built their own design practices throughout their four years at Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Design." 

- Senior Design Class 2018

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Designing the Computational Image/ Imagining Computational Design
Sep 23–Nov 12, 2017
  • About

Works by: Kristy Balliet / Kelly Bair (BairBalliet), Andrew Heumann, Dana Cupkova, Golan Levin, Benjamin Snell, Kyuha Shim, Zach Lieberman, Jürg Lehni, Carl Lostritto, Joseph Choma, Jonah Ross-Marrs 

Curated by Daniel Cardoso Llach

Designing the Computational Image/Imagining Computational Design showcases a selection of previously unseen or lesser-known drawings, films, and high-quality reproductions, as well as interactive software reconstructions, illuminating the twentieth-century emergence of new methods for design representation, simulation, and manufacturing linked to digital computers' capacities for information processing and display. Examining the formative period of numerical control and computer graphics technologies between …

Works by: Kristy Balliet / Kelly Bair (BairBalliet), Andrew Heumann, Dana Cupkova, Golan Levin, Benjamin Snell, Kyuha Shim, Zach Lieberman, Jürg Lehni, Carl Lostritto, Joseph Choma, Jonah Ross-Marrs 

Curated by Daniel Cardoso Llach

Designing the Computational Image/Imagining Computational Design showcases a selection of previously unseen or lesser-known drawings, films, and high-quality reproductions, as well as interactive software reconstructions, illuminating the twentieth-century emergence of new methods for design representation, simulation, and manufacturing linked to digital computers' capacities for information processing and display. Examining the formative period of numerical control and computer graphics technologies between 1949 and 1976, the exhibition traces their evolution from elemental geometric constructions into highly structured semantic models—and from government-funded research in universities into industry standards—shedding light on the social, technical, and aesthetic origins of present architectural production techniques. From blips on radar screens to perspectival representations and free-form surfaces, the exhibition uniquely reveals the confluence of technical innovations in software, data structures, and hardware with a new cultural imaginary of design, endowing computer-generated images with both geometric plasticity and a new type of agency as operative architectural artifacts.

The historical materials featured in the exhibition are drawn from the archives of institutions key to the development of these technologies, including Carnegie Mellon University; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the University of Cambridge, UK; and the Computer History Museum, among others.

Daniel Cardoso Llach is assistant professor in the School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University, where he teaches graduate and undergraduate architecture courses. His work explores problems ranging from social and cultural aspects of automation in design, the politics of representation and participation in software, and new methods for using data to visualize design as a socio-technical phenomenon. His recent research includes Builders of the Vision: Software and the Imagination of Design (Routledge, 2015), a book on the cultural history of computer-aided design and numerically controlled machinery, which examines how postwar technological projects shaped conceptions of design informing current architectural practices. He holds a PhD and an MS (with honors) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a BArch from the Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá. He has been a research fellow at MECS, Germany, and a visiting scholar at the University of Cambridge.

 

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Hadi Tabatabai: Transitional Spaces
Sep 23–Nov 12, 2017
  • About
  • Artists

Co-presented by wats:ON? Festival
Curated by Spike Wolff 

Through an elegant combination of drawing, painting and sculpture, Hadi Tabatabai's work describes a place that is as much an idea as a physical location. These compositions embody liminality: that is, they create a constant experience of sensations that exist at the limen, or edge, of perception. To bring about this state, Tabatabai has removed all possible distractions. Narrative and figuration, even figure and ground, have been excised from these delicate combinations of squares, rectangles and floating lines.

Tabatabai uses the physical nature of the …

Co-presented by wats:ON? Festival
Curated by Spike Wolff 

Through an elegant combination of drawing, painting and sculpture, Hadi Tabatabai's work describes a place that is as much an idea as a physical location. These compositions embody liminality: that is, they create a constant experience of sensations that exist at the limen, or edge, of perception. To bring about this state, Tabatabai has removed all possible distractions. Narrative and figuration, even figure and ground, have been excised from these delicate combinations of squares, rectangles and floating lines.

Tabatabai uses the physical nature of the materials to create subtle shifts within the surface plane.  The lines are delineated by slightly raised or lowered edges of materials to create works that straddle the realm of the pictorial and the sculptural.  Through the use of light and shadow, depth of field, and other optical obfuscations, the positive and negative space in the paintings becomes indeterminate.  His work evokes the relationship between what is imagined on the surface and what is actually rendered—in a sense questioning what is being “looked at” or “seen.”

For the past twenty years Tabatabai has devoted his attention to a very tiny area—an area that comprises the physicality of a line and functions as the transitional space between two entities. He views the ‘line’ as empty space without an agenda or allegiance; it is neither here nor there. Tabatabai believes that by paying attention to this tiny, subtle, yet detailed space, one is forced to turn away from the outside world and focus inward on one’s own interior space.

As art historian, Peter Lodermeyer, described the work in a catalogue essay, “You have to look closely, as close as possible, then steadily until you can see the seeing itself. Watch yourself as you look in order to perceive.”

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Hadi Tabatabai
About the Artists
Hadi Tabatabai

Hadi Tabatabai was born in Mashhad, Iran, in 1964. He immigrated to the United States in 1977 with his family, settling in California. Tabatabai received a BS in industrial technology from California State University Fresno in 1985 and a BFA in painting from the San Francisco Art Institute in 1995.

Tabatabai's work has been shown in London, Paris, Turin, Frankfurt, Bonn, Bogotá, and widely in the United States. He has had solo exhibitions at Danese/Corey and Anthony Grant Galleries in New York, Brian Gross Fine Art and Stephen Wirtz Gallery in San Francisco, Peter Blake Gallery in Laguna Beach, and Inde/Jacobs in Marfa, Texas.

His works are included in the collections of the Achenbach Foundation at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Berkeley Art Museum, (Berkeley, California), Delaware Art Museum (Wilmington, Delaware), the Contemporary Museum (Honolulu, Hawaii), Colby College Museum of Art (Waterville, Maine), the Blanton Museum of Art at The University of Texas (Austin), Davis Museum at Wellesley College (Wellesley, MA), Bowdoin College Museum of Art (Brunswick, ME), The Lannan Foundation, The Progressive Corporation Art Collection, the Werner H. Kramarsky Collection, Lloyd Cotsen collection, Gerald E. Buck Collection, the Estate of Agnes Martin and Luc Tuymans.

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Worlds Within
Sep 22–Dec 15, 2017
  • About

Works by: Rob Kesseler, Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka, Carl Ignaz Leopold Kny, Edwin H. Reiber

Co-presented with Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation
Curated by Lugene Bruno and John Carson 

Worlds Within opens our eyes to the generally unseen world of plants and their internal architecture, textures, patterns and functions. It reveals repeating patterns in nature: generic structures and forms, which recur on a macro and micro scale.

The graphic impact of historical instructive botanical wall charts and models alongside monumentalized, hand-colored micrographs of seeds and pollen by Rob Kesseler creates a remarkable visual bridge between …

Works by: Rob Kesseler, Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka, Carl Ignaz Leopold Kny, Edwin H. Reiber

Co-presented with Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation
Curated by Lugene Bruno and John Carson 

Worlds Within opens our eyes to the generally unseen world of plants and their internal architecture, textures, patterns and functions. It reveals repeating patterns in nature: generic structures and forms, which recur on a macro and micro scale.

The graphic impact of historical instructive botanical wall charts and models alongside monumentalized, hand-colored micrographs of seeds and pollen by Rob Kesseler creates a remarkable visual bridge between the conventional purpose of scientific illustration as used in educational materials, and the aesthetic interpretation of scientific imagery in contemporary art. 

Worlds Within is a unique collaboration between the Hunt Institute and The Miller Gallery. The two venues, at either end of the Carnegie Mellon University campus, will be exhibiting work by British artist Rob Kesseler, alongside 19th-century botanical wall charts from Carl Ignaz Leopold Kny’s series Botanische Wandtafeln. Complementing the forms represented in these charts and photographs will be a selection of models of marine organisms made of glass in the 19th-century by Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka and made of glacite in the early 20th-century by Edwin H. Reiber. The glass models have been kindly loaned by the Carnegie Museum of Natural History.

The work in the Hunt Institute offers a more comprehensive comparison between the micrographs and the historical charts and models, while the Miller Gallery exhibition features a fuller range of Kesseler’s recent art work. Both sections of this joint exhibition celebrate the extraordinary aesthetic interrelationships between historically different methods of visually interpreting the wonders of botanical phenomena, which are not readily visible to the naked eye.

Viewers are encouraged to visit both venues to experience these stunning visual juxtapositions, in which the many complexities of representing plants are concentrated into mesmeric visual images and objects. 

ABOUT THE CURATORS 

Since 1996, Curator of Art Lugene Bruno has held a position at the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, where she has immersed herself in the botanical art and library collection. She is responsible for all activities of the Art Department and curates the art collection and twice-yearly exhibitions in the Institute's gallery, including the triennial International Exhibition of Botanical Art & Illustration. She designs the exhibitions and companion catalogues; provides talks and tours related to collection items to the public and at botanical conferences; responds to research requests; and makes available for study selections of the art collection to visiting scholars, students and botanical artists. She is an honorary member of several botanical art and florilegia societies in the United States and abroad.  She is also a practicing artist working with gestural abstraction that is inspired by street markings, employing the mediums of photography and water-soluable graphite drawing. She is a member of the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh and exhibits her work regionally.

For the past 30 years, working in various media, John Carson has wittily and provocatively explored the interface between high and low culture and has sought to widen the audience for contemporary art practice. He has exhibited and performed internationally and has made works for television and radio. He is best known for performative projects such as I’d Walk from Cork to Larne to See the Forty Shades of Green (a 320 mile,14 day photographic journey) and A Bottle of Stout in Every Pub in Buncrana (a one day endurance test). From 1986 to 1991 he was Production Director of Artangel, a London-based organization presenting temporary artworks in public locations. He has been a visiting lecturer at various schools and colleges in Ireland, UK, Europe, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. He taught at the National College of Art and Design in Dublin, Ireland and at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London, England, where he was Course Director of the BFA program from 1999 to 2006. He was Head of the School of Art at Carnegie Mellon University from 2006 to 2016, and is currently a member of the teaching faculty.

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Causing A Scene
Aug 19–Sep 3, 2017
  • About

Co-organized by The Center for the Arts in Society

Works by: Edda Fields-Black, John Carson and Jennifer Keating-Miller, Larry Shea

Every three years CAS reinvents itself with a new themed initiative, where two coordinators, an artist and a scholar, structure a topic and select projects that engage in a focused exploration of that topic. We approached “Performance” as an expansive form, looking beyond the traditional relationship between an audience and an actor to consider how people performatively frame their lives through social rituals, athletics, digital capture devices, and everyday acts. The rubric of …

Co-organized by The Center for the Arts in Society

Works by: Edda Fields-Black, John Carson and Jennifer Keating-Miller, Larry Shea

Every three years CAS reinvents itself with a new themed initiative, where two coordinators, an artist and a scholar, structure a topic and select projects that engage in a focused exploration of that topic. We approached “Performance” as an expansive form, looking beyond the traditional relationship between an audience and an actor to consider how people performatively frame their lives through social rituals, athletics, digital capture devices, and everyday acts. The rubric of "Performance" has also been a fruitful springboard for CAS's ongoing consideration of how the distinctions between the work and place of “artist” and “scholar” might be reassessed and transformed through collaborative work. Directed by James Duesing, and co-organized by Wendy Arons of the School of Drama and Kristina Straub of the English Department, the CAS Performance Initiative (2014-2017) has drawn together faculty members who undertook three major projects: Ghosts in the Machines, by Larry Shea (School of Drama); Performing Peace in the North of Ireland, by John Carson (School of Art) and Jennifer Keating-Miller (Dietrich Dean’s Office and English Department); and Requiem for Rice, by Edda Fields-Black (History Department). The three-year initiative has involved speakers, workshops, panel discussions, and an evening of performances titled "Drama Queens." The projects have developed courses that included field trips to Ireland and brought in outside experts to engage with students at Carnegie Mellon and constituencies outside the university. This exhibition presents selections from the scenes that have been caused over the past three years by the CAS Performance Initiative.

The Center for the Arts in Society (CAS) is a collaborative research effort comprised of artists and scholars from the CMU faculty. Situated between the College of Fine Arts and of the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences, CAS aims to explore the role, place, and impact of the arts both in the workings of social power and in processes of social change.  CAS is dedicated to the exploration of the ways diverse forms of social and political engagement have shaped the history of the arts and might drive their transformation in the future. 

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HACKING / MODDING / REMIXING as Feminist Protest
Jan 28–Feb 26, 2017
  • About

Curated by Angela Washko

Works by: Addie Wagenknecht (Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry Fellow 2014), Anne-Marie Schleiner, Annina Rüst, Cat Mazza (CMU Alumna, SoArt 1999), Channel Two, Dara Birnbaum (CMU Alumna, SoArch 1969), Elisa Kreisinger, Kathy High, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Mary Flanagan, micha cárdenas, Morehshin Allahyari, Myfanwy Ashmore, Olia Lialina, Rachel Rampleman, Rachel Simone Weil, RAFiA Santana, Skawennati, Soda Jerk and VNS Matrix, Sondra Perry, and Suzie Silver (CMU Professor of Art)

HACKING / MODDING / REMIXING as Feminist Protest is an exhibition of twenty two artists, designers and developers working at the intersection …

Curated by Angela Washko

Works by: Addie Wagenknecht (Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry Fellow 2014), Anne-Marie Schleiner, Annina Rüst, Cat Mazza (CMU Alumna, SoArt 1999), Channel Two, Dara Birnbaum (CMU Alumna, SoArch 1969), Elisa Kreisinger, Kathy High, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Mary Flanagan, micha cárdenas, Morehshin Allahyari, Myfanwy Ashmore, Olia Lialina, Rachel Rampleman, Rachel Simone Weil, RAFiA Santana, Skawennati, Soda Jerk and VNS Matrix, Sondra Perry, and Suzie Silver (CMU Professor of Art)

HACKING / MODDING / REMIXING as Feminist Protest is an exhibition of twenty two artists, designers and developers working at the intersection of art and technology to intervene on dominant voices in tech and popular culture, producing critical works that give visibility to women's perspectives and experiences often marginalized, ignored, or dismissed.

Angela Washko is an artist, game developer and organizer devoted to creating new forums for discussions of feminism in spaces frequently hostile toward it. Since 2012, Washko has operated The Council on Gender Sensitivity and Behavioral Awareness in World of Warcraft, an ongoing intervention inside the most popular online role-playing game of all time. 

Washko’s practice has been highlighted in Art in America, Frieze Magazine, Time Magazine, The Guardian, ArtForum, the New York Times and more. Her projects have been presented nationally and internationally at venues including Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art (Helsinki), Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, the Milan Design Triennale, and the Shenzhen Independent Animation Biennial. Her writing has been published in Creative Time Reports, FIELD Journal of Socially Engaged Art Criticism, Copenhagen University Peer Reviewed Journal, Neural Magazine, VASA Journal of Images and Culture, .dpi Feminist Magazine of Art and Digital Culture and more.

Additional support for Hacking / Modding / Remixing as Feminist Protest comes in part from the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, the CMU School of Art, and Conflict Kitchen.

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Architecture With and Without Le Corbusier + The Chapel of the Mosquitos
Aug 20–Nov 13, 2016
  • About

José Oubrerie architecte/ Atelier Wylde-Oubrerie 

Associate Curator Spike Wolff

José Oubrerie is Professor Emeritus at the Knowlton School of Architecture at Ohio State University. An internationally renowned French architect and protégé of Le Corbusier, Oubrerie was the project architect for the Saint-Pierre de Firminy Church, seeing the final design through to completion in 2006. Other projects include the French Cultural Center in Syria, the Miller House in Kentucky, and The Chapel of the Mosquitoes in New York. Oubrerie is Honorary AIA, author of the recently released Architecture With and Without LeCorbusier, and …

José Oubrerie architecte/ Atelier Wylde-Oubrerie 

Associate Curator Spike Wolff

José Oubrerie is Professor Emeritus at the Knowlton School of Architecture at Ohio State University. An internationally renowned French architect and protégé of Le Corbusier, Oubrerie was the project architect for the Saint-Pierre de Firminy Church, seeing the final design through to completion in 2006. Other projects include the French Cultural Center in Syria, the Miller House in Kentucky, and The Chapel of the Mosquitoes in New York. Oubrerie is Honorary AIA, author of the recently released Architecture With and Without LeCorbusier, and is currently visiting professor at the School of Architecture at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Additional support for Architecture With and Without Le Corbusier comes in part from the Steven Myron Holl Foundation, the Knowlton School of Architecture, Carnegie Mellon School of Architecture and the Alan H Rider Distinguished Lecture fund. Special thanks to Frost Engineering (Waterjet Cutting) Cincinnati and NBBJ Architects, Columbus OH, Brian Polgar, Alex Mann, Cory Frost and Dustin Page, Benjamin Wilke, Mark O’Bryan, Romain Chazalon, Luis Burriel-Bielza Chuck Paros, Mark Pataky and Alicia Civile.

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MAXIMUM MINIMUM IN UNUM
Jan 23–Feb 28, 2016
  • About
  • Selected Art
  • Artists

Curated by Josh Reiman and Suzanne Slavick

This exhibition features artists whose work eludes maximalist or minimalist classification. They probe or collapse extremes, whether ideological or aesthetic. Multiple dualities run parallel or intersect in their practices. Co-curators Josh Reiman and Susanne Slavick selected works in which these seemingly opposing qualities — both separately and together — coalesce.

Participating artists, all alumni of the Carnegie Mellon School of Art, include: Ben Bigelow, Felipe Castelblanco, Peter Coffin, Ron Desmett, Maggie Haas, Institute for New Feeling (Scott Andrew, Agnes Bolt and Nina Sarnelle), Laleh Mehran, …

Curated by Josh Reiman and Suzanne Slavick

This exhibition features artists whose work eludes maximalist or minimalist classification. They probe or collapse extremes, whether ideological or aesthetic. Multiple dualities run parallel or intersect in their practices. Co-curators Josh Reiman and Susanne Slavick selected works in which these seemingly opposing qualities — both separately and together — coalesce.

Participating artists, all alumni of the Carnegie Mellon School of Art, include: Ben Bigelow, Felipe Castelblanco, Peter Coffin, Ron Desmett, Maggie Haas, Institute for New Feeling (Scott Andrew, Agnes Bolt and Nina Sarnelle), Laleh Mehran, Shana Moulton, Zak Prekop, Paul Rouphail, Diane Samuels, Carrie Schneider, Jina Valentine, Rebecca Vaughan, and Gregory Witt.

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Shana Moulton, The Undiscovered Drawer, 2013, 9:19, Material A, Material B, Material C
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Ron Desmett, 2015
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Peter Coffin, 2012
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Jina Valentine, 2015
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Felipe Castelblanco, 2014
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Zak Prekop, 2014
Ben Bigelow, Felipe Castelblanco, Peter Coffin, Ron Desmett, Maggie Haas, The Institute for New Feeling , Laleh Mehran, Shana Moulton, Paul Rouphail, Zak Prekop, Diane Samuels, Carrie Schneider, Jina Valentine, Rebecca Vaughan, Gregory Witt
About the Artists
Ben Bigelow

Ben Bigelow’s work explores the shifting identity of Americana and its relationship to technology through combinations of video, installation, performance, and photography. Venues for past exhibitions include: Kala Art Institute, Berkeley; City Limits Gallery, Oakland; the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; and the Harlem Factory Fest in New York City. In 2014, he lectured in the Department of Art & Art History at Stanford University and in 2015 was a faculty member in the SIM Department at the Massachusetts College of Art & Design. He has an MFA from Stanford University and a BFA (2008) from Carnegie Mellon University. Originally from Los Angeles, he currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. http://benbigelow.com

Ben Bigelow’s work explores the shifting identity of Americana and its relationship to technology through combinations of video, installation, performance, and photography. Venues for past exhibitions include: Kala Art Institute, Berkeley; City Limits Gallery, Oakland; the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; and the Harlem Factory Fest in New York City. In 2014, he lectured in the Department of Art & Art History at Stanford University and in 2015 was a faculty member in the SIM Department at the Massachusetts College of Art & Design. He has an MFA from Stanford University and a BFA (2008) from Carnegie Mellon University. Originally from Los Angeles, he currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. http://benbigelow.com

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Felipe Castelblanco

Felipe Castelblanco is a multidisciplinary artist working at the intersection of socially engaged and new media art. A 2013 MFA alumnus of Carnegie Mellon, he attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2012. International venues for his work have included: the Royal Academy of Arts, London; the San Diego Museum of Art; FAD Festival in Belo Horizonte, Brazil; FIVAC Festival in Camagüey, Cuba; PRACTICE Gallery in Philadelphia; the Valenzuela Klenner Gallery in Bogotá, Colombia; and in storefronts and street corners throughout the United States. Castelblanco has been the recipient of the 2013 John Fergus Post MFA Fellowship at The Ohio State University in Columbus, the 2014 Starr Fellowship at the Royal Academy in London, and in 2015 served as a Cultural Emissary in the Philippines with U.S State Department and U.S Embassy in Manila through the American Arts Incubator exchange program. www.felipecastelblanco.com

Felipe Castelblanco is a multidisciplinary artist working at the intersection of socially engaged and new media art. A 2013 MFA alumnus of Carnegie Mellon, he attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2012. International venues for his work have included: the Royal Academy of Arts, London; the San Diego Museum of Art; FAD Festival in Belo Horizonte, Brazil; FIVAC Festival in Camagüey, Cuba; PRACTICE Gallery in Philadelphia; the Valenzuela Klenner Gallery in Bogotá, Colombia; and in storefronts and street corners throughout the United States. Castelblanco has been the recipient of the 2013 John Fergus Post MFA Fellowship at The Ohio State University in Columbus, the 2014 Starr Fellowship at the Royal Academy in London, and in 2015 served as a Cultural Emissary in the Philippines with U.S State Department and U.S Embassy in Manila through the American Arts Incubator exchange program. www.felipecastelblanco.com

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Peter Coffin

Peter Coffin has mounted over 30 solo museum and gallery exhibitions internationally at venues such as: the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C.; the Center d’art Contemporain d’Ivry, France; The Barbican, London; Le Centre d’Art Contemporain de Fribourg, Switzerland; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; the Horticultural Society of New York; and Le Confort Moderne, Poitier. His work has been included in art biennials in Berlin, Belgrade, Liverpool, Moscow, New York, Trentino and Yokohama and in numerous museums such as: the Singapore Art Museum; Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt; El Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo, Seville, Spain; Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco; The Geffen Contemporary at MoCA, Los Angeles; Boston Museum of Fine Arts; Nouveau Musée National de Monaco, Monaco; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; the CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France; Saatchi Gallery, London; Hessel Museum of Art, Annandale-On-Hudson, NY; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Rome; and Tate Britain, London among others. Peter Coffin was born in Berkeley, California in 1972. He studied at the University of California, Davis and is a 2000 MFA alumnus of Carnegie Mellon. He lives and works in New York City.  http://petercoffinstudio.com

Ron Desmett

Ron Desmett is a contemporary sculptor using molten black glass to disturb the canons of craft. Black glass is his holy grail. Subverting a material known for its sleek beauty and transparency, he creates slumped, dark and earthy forms. Desmett is a descendant of Belgian coal miners relocated in the diaspora of migrants to the mines of Clearfield, Pennsylvania where he was born in 1948. He has received awards from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, including Pennsylvania Artist of the Year 2013-2014. In 2010, he was Artist in Residence at the Tacoma Museum and has also been a resident artist at Artpark in Lewiston, NY and the Contemporary Art Center at Wheaton Village, Millville, NJ. His works are in the permanent collections of the Renwick Galleries of the Smithsonian Institution, the Carnegie Museum of Art, the Westmoreland Museum, the Tacoma Museum of Glass, the American Museum of Glass at Wheaton Village and the Corning Museum of Glass in New York. http://www.rondesmett.com

Maggie Haas

Maggie Haas is an artist and writer based in San Francisco. She holds an MFA from California College of the Arts, and a BFA (2003) from Carnegie Mellon University. Haas has exhibited at venues including the Lab, San Francisco; Arttransponder, Berlin; Slow, Chicago; and the Royal Nonesuch Gallery, Oakland. She is Featured Artist Editor at Little Paper Planes, and coproduces the interview series LPP In Conversation for Art Practical.  http://www.maggiehaas.net

The Institute for New Feeling

The Institute for New Feeling is a research clinic committed to the development of new ways of feeling, and ways of feeling new. The Institute is the inventor of its own authority, borrowing from the language of corporate branding and new age healing, as well as that of mainstream medicine, therapy, health and beauty. It’s work takes the form of treatments, therapies, retreats and wellness products that acknowledge the contemporary digital age’s modes of production, consumption, and distribution of goods and services.

Founded by Scott Andrew, Agnes Bolt, and Nina Sarnelle, IfNf’s physical existence is regularly shifting but its long term plan is to open a permanent space/spa in Los Angeles. 

The Institute for New Feeling has recently exhibited at Recess, NY; Southern Exposure, San Francisco; Thank You For Coming and Eastside International, Los Angeles; Open Engagement Conference, Queens Museum of Art, NY; Spaces, Cleveland; Vox Populi, Philadelphia; and Threewalls, Chicago, among other venues. IfNf has been featured on Clocktower Radio and KChung Radio and their work has recently been reviewed in Art in America, Huffington Post, Animal NY, Fader, Hyperallergic, ArtFCity, and ArtHopper. http://institutefornewfeeling.com

Laleh Mehran

Laleh Mehran constructs elaborate artworks focused on complex intersections between politics, religion, and science. The progeny of Iranian scientists, Mehran’s relationship to these issues is necessarily complex, even more so given today’s political climate in which certain views can have extreme consequences. Her research, often modeled on and about the very ideas of science and technology, takes advantage of their cultural importance in order to articulate a set of ideas that require precisely these kinds of mediations from both political and religious intolerance. Considerations that shape her work are as veiled as they are explicit, as personal as they are political, and as critical as they are tolerant. Mehran received her MFA in 1997 from Carnegie Mellon. Her work has been shown individually and as part of collectives in venues including: The International Symposium on Electronic Art, United Arab Emirates; National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts; Electronic Language International Festival, Brazil; Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art; The Georgia Museum of Art; The Andy Warhol Museum; Denver Art Museum; Biennial of the Americas at the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver; 404 International Festival of Art & Technology, Argentina; Next 5 Minutes 4 Tactical Media Festival, Netherlands; and the European Media Arts Festival, Germany. Mehran is an Associate Professor and Graduate Director in Emergent Digital Practices at the University of Denver. http://lalehmehran.com

Shana Moulton

Shana Moulton creates evocative and oblique narratives in video and performance works. Combining an unsettling, wry humor with a low-tech, Pop sensibility, she plays a character whose interactions with the everyday world are both mundane and surreal, in a domestic sphere just slightly askew. As her protagonist navigates the enigmatic and possibly magical properties of her home decor, Moulton initiates relationships with objects and consumer products that are at once banal and uncanny. Shana Moulton was born in 1976. She studied at the University of California, Berkeley and Carnegie Mellon University where she received her MFA in 2004. Moulton has also attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine and studied at De Ateliers in Amsterdam. Her video work has been screened and exhibited at international venues including: Art in General, New York; Migros Museum, Zurich; Contemporary Museum of Art, Uppsala; Rencontres internationales Paris/Berlin; Aurora, Edinburgh; Dark Light Festival, Dublin: Impakt Festival, Utrecht; Internationale Kurzfilmtage, Oberhausen; Broadway 1602, New York; and Gimpel Fils, London. Moulton has performed at venues including The Kitchen, Electronic Arts Intermix, PERFORMA 09 and Socrates Sculpture Park in New York; Aurora Picture Show, Houston; and The Bluecoat, Liverpool, among others. Moulton lives and works in Brooklyn, New York and teaches at Kunstakademie in Muenster, Germany. http://www.shanamoulton.info

Paul Rouphail

Paul Rouphail is a painter who fuses architectural history, American pop
iconography, and linguistic turns of phrase. His works have been exhibited
at the The Gelman Gallery at the Rhode Island School of Design, Microscope
Gallery in Brooklyn and The Chautauqua Institution, among others. Rouphail’s work has been been reviewed online and in print, including in New American Paintings (Issue 122), The Chautauqua Daily (Howard Halle), and Gestalten Press’ Imagine Architecture (Lukas Feireiss and Robert Klanten). Rouphail is currently an MFA candidate at the Rhode Island School of Design. http://www.paulrouphail.com

Zak Prekop

Zak Prekop was born in 1979 in Chicago and currently lives and works in Brooklyn. He has shown his work in solo exhibitions at: Essex Street, New York; Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago; Thomas Duncan Gallery, Los Angeles; Hagiwara Projects, Tokyo; Galería Agustina Ferreyra, San Juan; Galería Marta Cervera, Madrid; and in Art Statements at Art Basel with Harris Lieberman Gallery. His work was included in the group exhibitions Painter Painter at The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; The Pittsburgh Biennial at the Carnegie Museum of Art; The Prague Biennial, and Greater New York 2010 at MoMA PS1, New York. His work is in the permanent collections of the Walker Art Center and the Carnegie Museum of Art.  thomasduncangallery.com/index.php?/project/zak-prekop

Diane Samuels

Diane Samuels is a visual artist with studio and public art practices. She is also co-founder of City of Asylum Pittsburgh that provides sanctuary to writers in exile. Her exhibitions include those at: the Andy Warhol Museum, the Carnegie Museum of Art, the Mattress Factory Museum in Pittsburgh; the Leo Baeck Institute and the Center for Book Arts, New York; the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Connecticut; the Contemporary Arts Center of Cincinnati; the Municipal Museum of Art in Gyor, Hungary; the Synagogue Center in Trnava, Slovakia; the Bernheimer Realschule in Buttenhausen, Germany; and the Czech Museum of Fine Arts.

In 2013 she was recipient of a Rockefeller Bellagio Residency in Italy and an American Academy in Jerusalem Fellowship. Samuels holds both BFA and MFA degrees from Carnegie Mellon University, a diploma from the Institute in Arts Administration at Harvard University and has received honorary doctorates from Seton Hill University and Chatham University. http://www.dianesamuels.net
 

Carrie Schneider

Carrie Schneider was born in Chicago in 1979 and is currently a Brooklyn-based artist working in photography, film and video installation. Her work has been shown widely at international arts institutions, including: the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; The Finnish Museum of Photography, Helsinki; Gallery 44, Toronto; Fotogalleriet, Oslo; the Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh; Trondheim Academy of Fine Art, Norway; The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen; The Kitchen, New York; Galería Alberto Sendrós, Buenos Aires; and the California Museum of Photography, Riverside. She received a Jerome Foundation NYC Film, Video, and Digital Production Grant, a residency fellowship from the Joan Mitchell Foundation, and a 2015 Creative Capital Award. She has also participated in residencies with the artist Rineke Dijkstra and with her longtime collaborator, choreographer Kyle Abraham. Schneider earned her BHA in Fine Arts and Psychology in 2001 from Carnegie Mellon University and her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, the Finnish Kuvataideakatemia (Academy of Fine Arts), Helsinki, as a Fulbright Fellow, and the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program. http://carrieschneider.net

Jina Valentine

Jina Valentine is an Assistant Professor of Art at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received her MFA from Stanford University and a BFA in 2001 from Carnegie Mellon. Her work has been exhibited widely at venues including: The Drawing Center, Marlborough Gallery, and the Studio Museum in Harlem, all in New York. She has been an artist in residence at The Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine, Sculpture Space in New York, Santa Fe Art Institute in New Mexico, and will be in residence at Project Row Houses in Houston, the Frans Masereel Centrum in Brussels, and the Joan Mitchell Center in Los Angeles in 2016. She is currently a fellow of the Open Sessions program at The Drawing Center, and is consulting curator for Elsewhere Museum’s Southern Constellation Series residency in Greensboro, North Carlina. Black Lunch Table, a collaborative project co-founded at Skowhegan in 2005 with New York based artist Heather Hart, was awarded a 2016 Creative Capital Fellowship and a Digital Innovation Fellowship through the Institute for Arts and Humanities at UNC. www.jinavalentine.com

Rebecca Vaughan

Rebecca Vaughan received her BFA cum laude in Sculpture at the University of Colorado, Boulder and an MFA in 2001 at Carnegie Mellon. She is currently the Program Director at the Art Students League of Denver and former Chair of Fine Arts and Head of Sculpture at the Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design. She held a residency as a Resource Artist at Redline Denver from 2011-2013. Prior positions included: working as project manager for Ann Hamilton’s 2008 Circles of Operformance; assisting in other projects in Dialog: City, a city-wide arts event for the Democratic National Convention in Denver; serving as an Artist-Teacher for the Vermont College of Fine Art; and teaching as a visiting instructor at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. http://www.rebeccavaughan.com

Gregory Witt

Gregory Witt grew up in Indiana, where he completed a BFA in Sculpture at Indiana University in 2005. Since 2006, he has been living and making art in Pittsburgh, where he earned his MFA from Carnegie Mellon University in 2009. He has exhibited nationally, most recently at Brown University’s Bell Gallery and the University of West Virginia’s Mesaros Gallery. http://gregorywitt.com

Aftersound: Frequency, Attack, Return
Aug 21–Nov 22, 2015
  • About
  • Artists

Curated by Melissa Ragona and Margaret Cox 

Sound has entered contemporary art in profound and unexpected ways. This exhibition explores sound’s infiltration into contemporary discussions of aural and visual culture, with a particular focus on sound visualization, the physics of sound, political uses of sound, i.e. sonic warfare and DIY, as well as the resurgence of neo-metaphysical experiments with sound as a portal to new sensory experiences.

Featured Artists: Paul DeMarinis, Michael Johnsen, Victoria Keddie, Caroline Record, Marina Rosenfeld, Jesse Stiles, Sergei Tcherepnin and more.

Pioneers of Sound + Archive: Maryanne Amacher, Cathy Berberian, John Cage, …

Curated by Melissa Ragona and Margaret Cox 

Sound has entered contemporary art in profound and unexpected ways. This exhibition explores sound’s infiltration into contemporary discussions of aural and visual culture, with a particular focus on sound visualization, the physics of sound, political uses of sound, i.e. sonic warfare and DIY, as well as the resurgence of neo-metaphysical experiments with sound as a portal to new sensory experiences.

Featured Artists: Paul DeMarinis, Michael Johnsen, Victoria Keddie, Caroline Record, Marina Rosenfeld, Jesse Stiles, Sergei Tcherepnin and more.

Pioneers of Sound + Archive: Maryanne Amacher, Cathy Berberian, John Cage, George Crumb, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Iannis Xenakis, and more.

Featured Visual Scores: Roger Beebe, Lin Culbertson, Luca Forcucci, Kraig Grady, Scott Kiernan, Jonna Kina, Zach Layton, Golan Levin, Eric Normand, Eric Raynaud, Dmitry Shubin, Matt Wellins and more in the gallery + online!

Additional support for Aftersound comes in part from The Frank-Ratchye Studio for Creative Inquiry. Funding for the VIA 2015: Marina Rosenfeld Site-specific event comes from Ideate, and Listening Spaces media initiative from the Center for Arts in Society. Special thanks to the Arts Library and Special Collections, Carnegie Mellon University Libraries with a very special thanks to Mo Dawley, Art and Drama Librarian, Mary Catharine Johnsen, Senior Librarian, Special Collections Librarian for Fine & Rare Book Room, Liaison Librarian to the School of Design; and Kristin Heath, Music and Catalog Librarian, Liaison Librarian to the School of Music.

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John Cage, Paul DeMarinis, Michael Johnsen, Victoria Keddie, Caroline Record, Marina Rosenfeld, Jesse Stiles, Sergei Tcherepnin
About the Artists
John Cage
  John Cage (born, 1912 in LA, California- died, 1992 in New York) is among history’s most influential artistic innovators, who broadened the definitions of music, sound, and most importantly, silence. Experimenting with notions of readymade sound, chance operations, duration, indeterminacy, and numerous conceptual innovations, Cage changed the face of Western music and sound compositional processes and performance. Working with his long time professional and romantic partner, Merce Cunningham, he also led inventive forays into dance, theater, film, and many other aspects of both performance and visual art. By rethinking conventional instruments, he transformed the use of pianos, into sounding objects called “prepared pianos” in which he placed objects between the strings in order to produce percussive and otherworldly sound effects. Likewise, he inspired generations to position radios, record players, and tape recorders at the center of their practices, to see the “electronic” as new kind of time-based media in sound and performing arts. By placing a print of the visual score for his multi-channel tape work, Fontana Mix (1958) at the center of our exhibition, we are pointing to the vast influence Cage has had upon generations of artists, especially those featured in our current exhibition, exploring, as Cage did the edges of ...

 

John Cage (born, 1912 in LA, California- died, 1992 in New York) is among history’s most influential artistic innovators, who broadened the definitions of music, sound, and most importantly, silence. Experimenting with notions of readymade sound, chance operations, duration, indeterminacy, and numerous conceptual innovations, Cage changed the face of Western music and sound compositional processes and performance. Working with his long time professional and romantic partner, Merce Cunningham, he also led inventive forays into dance, theater, film, and many other aspects of both performance and visual art. By rethinking conventional instruments, he transformed the use of pianos, into sounding objects called “prepared pianos” in which he placed objects between the strings in order to produce percussive and otherworldly sound effects. Likewise, he inspired generations to position radios, record players, and tape recorders at the center of their practices, to see the “electronic” as new kind of time-based media in sound and performing arts. By placing a print of the visual score for his multi-channel tape work, Fontana Mix (1958) at the center of our exhibition, we are pointing to the vast influence Cage has had upon generations of artists, especially those featured in our current exhibition, exploring, as Cage did the edges of temporality across audio arts. 


Read more about the numerous exhibitions, performances, lectures and writings by John Cage here: johncage.org/

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Paul DeMarinis

Paul DeMarinis (Stanford, California) has been making noises with wires, batteries and household appliances since the age of four. One of the first artists to use microcomputers, DeMarinis has toiled since the 1970's in the areas of interactive software, synthetic speech, noise and obsolete or impossible media. He has created installations, performances and public artworks throughout North America, Europe, Australia and Asia, including The Kitchen in New York, Festival d'Automne a Paris, Het Apollohuis in Holland, Ars Electronica in Linz, I.C.C. in Tokyo, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Shanghai Biennale, among many others. He is a Professor in the Department of Art & Art History at Stanford University in California.
Read more here: well.com/~demarini/

Paul DeMarinis (Stanford, California) has been making noises with wires, batteries and household appliances since the age of four. One of the first artists to use microcomputers, DeMarinis has toiled since the 1970's in the areas of interactive software, synthetic speech, noise and obsolete or impossible media. He has created installations, performances and public artworks throughout North America, Europe, Australia and Asia, including The Kitchen in New York, Festival d'Automne a Paris, Het Apollohuis in Holland, Ars Electronica in Linz, I.C.C. in Tokyo, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Shanghai Biennale, among many others. He is a Professor in the Department of Art & Art History at Stanford University in California.
Read more here: well.com/~demarini/

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Michael Johnsen

Michael Johnsen (Pittsburgh) is best known as a performer of live-electronics using an integrated menagerie of custom devices whose idiosyncratic behaviors are revealed through complex interactions. His work is characterized by an intense focus on observation, the way a shepherd watches sheep. The extensive patching of large numbers of devices produces teeming chirps, sudden transients and welcomed modes of failure. In brief, Johnsen embraces the dirt in pure electronics. Recent research includes circuit-level documentation of David Tudor’s folkloric homemade instruments. His work has been shown widely at MoMA, SF Cinematheque, Radio France, Wesleyan University, Anthology Film Archives (New York) and Musique Action (France). 
Read more here: vimeo.com/69916070

Victoria Keddie

Victoria Keddie (New York) works in varying media involving audio/visual signal generation, magnetic field recording, and broadcast. She is Co-director of E.S.P. TV, a nomadic, live TV studio that hybridizes technologies to realize synthetic environments for performance. She has performed and exhibited at numerous venues and festivals throughout the US, such as, the New Museum, the Museum of Arts and Design, The Kitchen, Museum of Moving Image, Issue Project Room, and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Her work has also been featured internationally in Dublin, Reykjavik, Berlin, London and Naples. She received her MA from New York University with a focus on the preservation of time-based media.  
Read more here: victoriakeddie.com

Caroline Record

Caroline Record (Pittsburgh) is an artist and technologist who uses code to create her own artistic systems. These systems are at once clever and sensual, incorporating extreme tactility with ephemeral, abstract logic. Her work has been featured in exhibitions at the Carnegie Science Center, Space Gallery, The Miller Gallery, and The Brewhouse Association. Fellowships include the Studio for Creative Inquiry at Carnegie Mellon University, Brewhouse Association Artist in Residence, and Yale University Norfolk. She is a recent graduate of both the BFA School of Art and Human Computer Interaction Masters programs at Carnegie Mellon University.
Read more here: carolinerecord.com/

Marina Rosenfeld

Marina Rosenfeld (New York) is known equally as a composer of large-scale performances and an experimental turntablist working with hand-crafted dub plates. She has been a leading voice in the increasing hybridization between the domains of visual art and music with recent solo projects for the Museum of Modern Art in New York; SPOR, Ultima, Wien Modern and Holland Festivals; the Whitney, Liverpool and PERFORMA Biennials; and many others. She has created chamber and choral works, as well as a series of installation/performance works, often mounted in monumental spaces, such as the Park Avenue Armory in New York and Western Australia's Midland Railway Workshops, deploying complexes of unamplified live performers and custom loudspeaker installations. Rosenfeld is Co-chair of Music/Sound, Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, Bard College.
Read more here: marinarosenfeld.com

Jesse Stiles

Jesse Stiles (Pittsburgh) is an electronic composer, performer, installation artist, and software designer.  Stiles’ work has been featured at internationally recognized institutions including the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Lincoln Center, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Park Avenue Armory, and Carnegie Hall. He has collaborated with many leading figures in experimental music including Pauline Oliveros, Meredith Monk, David Behrman, and Morton Subotnick. His recordings have been published by Conrex Records, Specific Recordings, Gagarin Records, and Araca Recs. Stiles is currently a Professor in the School of Music at Carnegie Mellon University, where he leads courses on emerging music technologies. 
Read more here: jts3k.com

Sergei Tcherepnin

Sergei Tcherepnin (New York) composes sound works that are actualized through sculptural forms, objects that exist simultaneously as speakers and instruments. He explores visitors’ capacities to affect and be affected by sound through their bodies as much as their auditory systems. His performances and exhibitions include MIT List Visual Arts Center, Boston; The Kitchen, New York; Foksal Gallery Foundation, Warsaw; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Pavilion of Georgia at the 55th Venice Biennale; Murray Guy, New York; Karma International, Zurich; Guggenheim Museum, New York; and the 30th São Paulo Biennial, Brazil, just to name a few. He participated in the 2014 Whitney Biennial and is a recipient of 2014 Villa Romana Fellowship in Florence, Italy.  
Read more here: murrayguy.com/sergei-tcherepnin/biography/

Miller Gallery is now Miller ICA!

Miller Gallery is now Miller ICA!

Carnegie Mellon University's Regina Gouger Miller Gallery will relaunch this fall as the Miller Institute for Contemporary Art (Miller ICA). Under the new leadership of Director Elizabeth Chodos, the Miller ICA will harness the power of contemporary art to connect local and national audiences to new ideas and fresh ways of thinking about some of society's most pressing issues.

Since joining the university one year ago, Chodos recognized Carnegie Mellon's responsibility to the greater public.

"I believe deeply that art has the power to transform and that contemporary art offers society a vehicle to participate directly in social change," she said.

"The Miller ICA offers a place where the public encounters all of the fresh thinking and exciting research that defines CMU," Chodos continued. "Art is about communicating and connecting people to one another through the exchange of ideas. We can create opportunities for dialogue and interaction and build a bridge between campus and the public through conversation about contemporary art."

Founded in 2000, the Miller Gallery has gained recognition for exhibiting top regional artists and emerging talent from CMU's College of Fine Arts. The gallery has since evolved to present challenging, curated contemporary work by national and international artists.

The Miller ICA marks a new chapter for the free and open public space. Defined by robust programming like other institutes for contemporary art across the country, the Miller ICA's transformation will be highlighted by a fresh vision and mission, a new website and identity. The changes will allow for new ways to connect online and in person and a suite of dynamic programs that amplify the intersection of current events, CMU's groundbreaking research and contemporary art.

"Under the traditional gallery model, the space was almost exclusively focused on exhibitions, whereas the new model of an institute for contemporary art expands the possibilities for public encounters with art," Chodos said. "Although exhibitions remain the centerpiece of programming, this new model adds a variety of public events and publications - print and online - that increase dialogue about contemporary art and its relevance in today's society.

"The Miller ICA's ability as a mid-size entity is unique and bridges the gap between the large Pittsburgh museums and smaller grassroots arts organization," Chodos added. "It provides an access point for people to engage with CMU and a space where people can open a discourse around important societal issues."

Dan Martin, dean of the College of Fine Arts, said the new approach reflects CMU's flexibility and focus.

"Our new approach to programming and exhibitions is indicative of Carnegie Mellon's ability to provide a rich, reflective hybrid experience for our students, and to present new ideas and creative propositions to a general audience," Martin said. "Elizabeth is the perfect fit to lead us in this new direction. She has strong and successful arts-center leadership experience, a remarkable aesthetic and sharp curatorial skills."

Chodos said the Miller ICA will be a different kind of "idea machine."

"Our new programs will provide transformative experiences with contemporary art through conversation and exchange in our free and open public space. When you get people in conversation, that's where community starts — and we need that now more than ever," she said.

The Miller ICA opens to the public Aug. 18 with "Carrie Schneider: Reading Women," a solo exhibition of photography by CMU alumna Carrie Schneider, a 2001 graduate from CMU's Bachelor of Humanities and Arts program. This exhibition features nine photographs of sitters reading texts authored by women and is part of the artist's series called "Reading Women."

Additionally, Autumn House Press in Pittsburgh has announced they will be organizing a group of local women poets reading their work from 6 - 7 p.m. on Sept. 7. Later this fall, the Miller ICA will present "Paradox: The Body in the Age of AI," an exhibition curated by Chodos. This major exhibition takes a deeper look into the unconscious role of the human body in the advent of artificial intelligence.